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patientMpower Data from the Irish Thoracic Society Scientific Meeting 2022

By December 16, 2022No Comments

There were multiple poster presentations regarding the use of the patientMpower platform at the Irish Thoracic Society (ITS) annual scientific meeting held earlier this month, with five presentations spanning multiple indications. The number and breadth of the presentations reflects the high level of adoption of patientMpower technology by specialist respiratory services in Ireland. All presentations were strongly supportive of a remote approach to monitoring of patients with lung conditions:

  • In lung transplant: Remote monitoring demonstrated a positive impact on patient experience and clinical care, with the early identification of decline in lung function allowing timely investigation.
  • In CTD-ILD: Remote monitoring of spirometry was shown to be feasible and acceptable to patients with CTD-ILD, despite impaired hand function.
  • In asthma: Home spirometry was found to be an effective, well tolerated, and convenient way to monitor patient ability to effectively perform peak flow recordings and monitor response to treatment.
  • In CF: Analysis of real-life patient data shows home spirometry recordings correlated strongly with those measured in the pulmonary function lab. 
  • In COVID-19: Remote monitoring improved patient flow by reducing the length of stay and avoiding unnecessary hospital admissions, and reduced the need for ICU admissions by identifying patient deterioration at an earlier stage.

Findings from each of the presentations is summarised below, with data available in the meeting abstract book. Don’t hesitate to get in touch with us at info@patientMpower.com for further information. 

Effect of Elexacaftor-Tezaftor-Ivacaftor on a West of Ireland cohort of patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) and comparison of “smart” monitoring of patients compared to traditional lab and clinic based measurements

The adult CF team at Galway University Hospital reported on real-life clinical experience with Elexacaftor-Tezaftor-Ivacaftor (EFI) in their patient cohort. With home monitoring of spirometry and body weight as well as laboratory-based patient assessment the team also aimed to assess the accuracy of remote monitoring versus clinic measurement. In the 9 month period after commencing ETI therapy there were significant improvements in FEV1, BMI, sputum volume, quality of life and symptom score. The study confirmed the data from the hand-held spirometer correlated strongly with those measured in the pulmonary function lab. 

A remote monitoring project for post lung transplant recipients using a patientMpower digital mobile application (pMp app)

Members of the Lung Transplant Team at Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, reported on the successful introduction of the remote monitoring programme for the care of patients post-lung transplantation. 

From March 2021 to March 2022, 49 patients were enrolled in the programme, with service evaluation completed between August 2021 and March 2022. More than half of the participants (51%; n = 19) remained stable at home. Among the remaining (49%) who had episodes of decline in lung function or other concerning readings, 22% (n = 8) were found to have infection; 3% (n = 1) with rejection; 8% (n = 3) were false alarms due to poor technique and 16% (n = 6) had other issues such as hypo/hypertension and weight gain/loss. 96% of the participants found pMp app easy to use; 82% felt that the app gave them confidence and reassurance; 100% supported continuation of the service. The team concluded that remote monitoring demonstrated a positive impact on patient experience and the clinical care with the early identification of decline in lung function allowing timely investigation.

Remote Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) Monitoring in Patients with Connective Tissue Disease related Interstitial Lung Disease (CTD-ILD)

Staff from Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, reported on a study to determine if home spirometry monitoring can detect early progressive fibrosing ILD in CTD-ILD, resulting in timely treatment leading to improving mortality and morbidity. 113 patients were recruited. Preliminary data in 93 patients demonstrated that monitoring forced vital capacity (FVC) remotely via handheld spirometer is feasible and acceptable to patients with CTD-ILD despite impaired hand function.

COVID-19 Remote Monitoring Programme in Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital Drogheda 

Clinicians from Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital, Drogheda reported on clinical experience from the  COVID-19 Remote Monitoring programme. Between April 2020 and the end of December 2021, a total of 386 patients were enrolled in the program, and a total of 39 patients were readmitted to the hospital via fast-track access to the Respiratory team. They found remote monitoring was an effective service in controlling hospital capacity when there is an increased demand in hospital beds. It improves patient flow by reducing the length of stay and avoiding unnecessary hospital admissions and identifying patient deterioration at an earlier stage reducing the need for ICU admissions.

The use of remote electronic spirometry to assess patient adherence to peak flow monitoring in a tertiary teaching hospital

Clinicians from Beaumont Hospital, Dublin reported on a study which analysed adherence to remote handheld spirometry monitoring in patients with asthma over a 90-day period. Data from 17 patients demonstrated 71% recorded a spirometry reading greater than 66% of the time. Mean number of days where patients recorded one or more readings was 67 ± 27% with a median value of 77%. 97% of spirometry readings were recorded in less than 2 min. They concluded home monitoring of patient spirometry is an effective, well tolerated, and convenient way to monitor patient ability to effectively perform peak flow recordings and monitor response to treatment.